Community Groups   – These cross-division groups consist of eight to ten students and a faculty member who meet weekly. They take on collective projects in service of both the school and the community at large. These include volunteering at local organizations like    Rosie's Place women's shelter   ,    Birthday Wishes   , and    Project Linus   , and fundraising for both local and international service organizations. Community Groups also serve to build connections between students of different ages and social groups. When not working directly on a service project, Community Groups play games, create art projects, cook meals, and take field trips to local parks and eateries.

Community Groups – These cross-division groups consist of eight to ten students and a faculty member who meet weekly. They take on collective projects in service of both the school and the community at large. These include volunteering at local organizations like Rosie's Place women's shelterBirthday Wishes, and Project Linus, and fundraising for both local and international service organizations. Community Groups also serve to build connections between students of different ages and social groups. When not working directly on a service project, Community Groups play games, create art projects, cook meals, and take field trips to local parks and eateries.

  School Life and Beyond (SLAB)  - Students and staff meet weekly for all-school SLAB. Some of these meeting are led by the faculty, and some are led by the students themselves. During this time, community members share announcements, plan events and parties, propose changes to the Student Handbook or other school policies, and consider ways to participate in our local community. Students may also play games or share significant life changes or events. Guest speakers may also come and address the community about their work, often proposing ways in which students and faculty can take part. 

School Life and Beyond (SLAB) - Students and staff meet weekly for all-school SLAB. Some of these meeting are led by the faculty, and some are led by the students themselves. During this time, community members share announcements, plan events and parties, propose changes to the Student Handbook or other school policies, and consider ways to participate in our local community. Students may also play games or share significant life changes or events. Guest speakers may also come and address the community about their work, often proposing ways in which students and faculty can take part. 

  Mentoring and Peer Support (MAPS)  - MAPS fosters mentoring relationships between Meridian students. For new students in particular, the program provides a consistent peer resource to support their transition into a new social and academic environment. Mentors meet with mentees twice per month to engage in collaborative activities, set goals, answer questions, and discuss how the year is going. The program is mutually beneficial; mentees receive guidance, support, and institutional knowledge, and mentors develop leadership, strong communication skills, and expertise to aid them in college and beyond. Both groups of students develop skills of listening, empathy, conflict resolution, and personal development. Beyond the individual impact on mentors and mentees, MAPS is designed to build a strong community throughout Meridian as students forge lasting connections and take greater responsibility for their peers.   

Mentoring and Peer Support (MAPS) - MAPS fosters mentoring relationships between Meridian students. For new students in particular, the program provides a consistent peer resource to support their transition into a new social and academic environment. Mentors meet with mentees twice per month to engage in collaborative activities, set goals, answer questions, and discuss how the year is going. The program is mutually beneficial; mentees receive guidance, support, and institutional knowledge, and mentors develop leadership, strong communication skills, and expertise to aid them in college and beyond. Both groups of students develop skills of listening, empathy, conflict resolution, and personal development. Beyond the individual impact on mentors and mentees, MAPS is designed to build a strong community throughout Meridian as students forge lasting connections and take greater responsibility for their peers.